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More wine tastings mean more opportunities to sell your wines. This article covers some wine tasting venues that you may not have thought of yet. After reading this article, you’ll be able to host a wine tasting anytime you want.

The key is to find free of charge locations where you can host a tasting. All of these locations can be free of charge to you, although the guests may have paid a ticket or other fee from another entity. As long as they aren’t paying you directly, you’ll be fine. So, read on.

Please note that these are general ideas. You will need to check with you local liquor license board to get details on how to use each venue, if appropriate. 

1. Event managers

Every town has event managers, likely several. These are people that run fairs, festivals, and conferences for the public. Developing a relationship with these people could be very lucrative for you.

There are a couple of ways to leverage your relationship with event managers. First, they likely have a mailing list of past guests. You could work up a deal to contact their mailing list.

The second and more obvious option is to do a tasting at one of their events. Your booth would have to be comped. But, if you’re giving away free wine, they just might take you up on it.

Lastly, you probably have a mailing list of your own. Perhaps you can combine events with event manager, using your list or your combined lists. Adding some variety to your wine tasting format might just get a few folks to come back to another tasting.

2. Development managers at non-profits

Development managers at non-profits are another good set of contacts to develop. They also have lists and they also have events. Perhaps they will let you use their contact list if you can connect your wine sales to an outcome that’s important to them.

Just as with the event managers, you could also set up shop at one of their events and pour for guests. Development manager’s lists are usually of folks that donate money. So, these folks would be great buyers.

You could also co-sponsor an event with a non-profit. People are more likely to buy wine if it’s connected to a worthy cause. Give your tasters a bit of quality wine along with a feeling of giving back. It’s a winning combination.

3. Bed and breakfasts

Bed and breakfasts are usually short on amenities, but big on charm. Hosting a wine tasting at a local bed and breakfast would be a nice addition to their amenity line-up. You’ll just have to pick a day where there will be enough guests to make the visit worth it.

If the wine tasting event is big enough, the bed and breakfast might invite past guests to come as well. That would be a great way to get additional tasters through the door.

Some bed and breakfasts also have regular events. You should become a fixture at these. It’s a great way to get the word out about your wine business.

4. Micro-food businesses

Some states are passing micro-food business laws. These laws allow small home cooking operations to sell their wares in public places or sometimes from their homes. These entrepreneurs will make great partners for you. You can partner with them for specific events or be a constant fixture at their place of operation.

Think of ways to use their growing list of customers to beef up your buyer list. One way would be to pair your wines with one of their items.

5. Food truck round-ups

Perhaps you’ve seen food truck round-ups in your local strip mall parking lot. As long as the location of the round-up is private property, you can host a free tasting there.

Reach out to your favorite food truck operations and see if they have any round-ups scheduled. They might like to add your wine tasting as an amenity for their eaters.

6. Community events

Does your town have block parties or other community fairs? Consider hosting a tasting at one of these. If the location is private property, you should be able to hold a tasting there.
Just be sure that event is the sort that would have wine buyers. A fair aimed at kids would not be a good choice. But a local business fair or other kinds of community fairs might make sense.

People often enjoy supporting local small businesses just like yours. Make sure they know about your be setting up shop at the next community fair.

7. Public fairs and farmers markets

We discussed community events. But, public fairs and farmers market deserve their own section. People go to these fairs with the intent to shop. So, they are a great place to sell wine. Again, you will need to ensure that the fair is on private property.

There is an artisanal quality to many farmers markets and fairs. Play up this aspect of your wine if appropriate. Is there a story you can tell about the winemakers, the grapes or an experience someone had while drinking this wine?

8. Online events services

Meetup and other online event services allow you to post your events for free. Facebook has an event feature. Why not post your next wine tasting on one of these services?

Be careful to incentivize the right people to attend. There can be a number of no-shows when you’re advertising to strangers. One way to fix this issue to post pics of your events. Seeing people having so much fun will excite potential attendees.

Another tip, limit the number of attendees to under 20 so there’s a sense of scarcity. Creating scarcity will make potential attendees feel like they might miss out on this fun event.

9. Brick and mortar small businesses

Is there a great restaurant in town that doesn’t have a liquor license? What about a gourmet grocery? These are great places to have a wine tasting. It will bring people through the door.

You might pitch hosting a wine tasting on a slow night for them. See if you can pair the wines to an item in the store for extra cachet. 

Once you’ve developed a relationship, they may advertise the wine tastings with their audience. This will be another venue to get the word out. 

10. The next town over

People will drive about 20 minutes to get to a local business. If you’ve saturated most of the areas around you, try a town that’s 20 minutes away or farther. You’re likely to draw a different and new crowd of wine tasters. 

This idea can work especially well if you partner with a local business in that town. Then, you have a location for your tasting and can use their audience as a base of potential tasters. 

Now that you have access to all of these additional tasters, be sure to get their contact information. Keep developing your list by adding emails for each and every taster. 

 
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